Tiger Glass

Tiger Glass is the trade name given to a colourful glass with red, brown, orange banding and glassy fibres inside.

It is a man-made glass and is not naturally occurring. It is almost always sold as polished pieces – whether they are tumblestones or cut pieces like pyramids or points.

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Appearance, Uses and History

Tiger Glass is the trade name given to a colourful glass with red, brown, orange banding and glassy fibres inside.

It is a man-made glass and is not naturally occurring. It is almost always sold as polished pieces – whether they are tumblestones or cut pieces like pyramids or points.

Tiger Glass is obviously named in an attempt to confuse consumers with tigers eye, which it bears a superficial similarity to visually.


Locales

Unknown, manmade – likely in China.


Mineralogy

Chemistry
SiO2, a man made glass with unknown inclusions.
Colours and Variations
Clear, brown, red, orange, yellow, grey.
Streak
Luster
Fracture
Conchoidal – glass
Transparency
Transparent to translucent
Crystal habit
Glass chunks
Mohs hardness
Specific Gravity
Fluorescence
N/A
Easiest testing method
Common Treatments

Photos of Tiger Glass


Hazards and Warnings

Almost all rocks, minerals (and, frankly, almost all other substances on earth) can produce toxic dust when cutting, which can cause serious respiratory conditions including silicosis.
Tiger glass is a glass, so if broken, could be very sharp.

When cutting or polishing rocks, minerals, shells, etc, all work should be done wet to minimise the dust, and a suitable respirator or extraction system should be used.


Translations

Please note, Tiger Glass is a trade name and likely does not translate too well into other languages.


Further Reading / External Links

  • None known!